Not All Shin Splints Are Created Equal

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email
Print

Screen Shot 2017-03-14 at 5.52.01 PM

If you’re a runner, you’ve more than likely experienced shin pain at some point or another. Shin pain can range from relatively minor to quite severe. Like other injury terminology, shin split is a generic and catch-all term that typically refers to any pain in the shin area.

What most people don’t know is that shin splits are not a singular, specific ailment but rather three separate issues.

MUSCULAR

This is also referred to as exertional compartment syndrome. During exercise, increased blood flow increases the size of the shin muscle (tibialis anterior). However, like all muscles, the tibialis anterior is encased in fascia and can increase in size only so much. This increase in pressure on the fascia is what causes pain. Individuals who have tight fascia surrounding the tibialis anterior are the ones who most often experience exertional compartment syndrome. Typically once one stops running, the pain gradually subsides.

SKELETAL

This relates to injury or stress to the bone (tibia). This is commonly referred to as medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). However, this term is also used to denote connective tissue/fascia related to shin pain. This typically presents with pain on the inside of the tibia bone.

If the pain is on the front of the tibia (tibial spine), the individual should seek out a physician, as this type of injury is typically classified as more serious.

  • Continuing to run with a shin splint can lead to a stress fracture (small crack in a bone).

FASCIAL

Inflammation of the deep fascia surrounding the tibia can result in shin pain. This is often confused with bone pain.

SUMMARY

Conservative increases in both speed and distance are two of the best ways to help prevent shin splints. Additionally, performing stability exercises such as balancing on one leg, that stress the muscles to the front and side of the tibia are helpful in preventing shin splints. Lastly, changes in footwear, running gait and changes in biomechanics due to injury can also increase the chance for shin splints.

If you or a running client experiences spin splints, rest and non-impact exercise are advised. If rest does not minimize the shin splints, seeking out a physical therapist is advised.

http://orthopedics.about.com/od/overuseinjuries/a/compartment.htm
http://www.runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/inside-doctors-office-keep-shinsplints-away.
http://www.aapsm.org/tibial_fasciitis.html.

Rick Prince

Rick Prince

Founder/Director of United Endurance Sports Coaching Academy (UESCA).

Leave a Reply

Become a Certified Cycling Coach

UESCA Cycling Certification Please enter your email below to receive our newsletter and Cycling Certification course overview/syllabus… oh, and a link to get $50 off the certification price!


Recent Posts

Become a Certified Running Coach

Running Coach Certification

Please enter your email below to receive our newsletter and Running Certification course overview/syllabus… oh, and a link to get $50 off the certification price!





What People Are Saying

Brandon Fravel
Brandon Fravel
Running
Read More
"The running certification from UESCA was amazing! This certification provided detailed running modules that included images and videos. After I got my certification, I started my own running business and expended my clientele. Without all the help from UESCA, I wouldn’t be where I’m at today!"
Jennifer Prong
Jennifer Prong
Running
Read More
"The UESCA Running Coach Certification program was very well-rounded, detailed and captivating! It was very convenient to be able to study on my own schedule which allowed me to finish my certification in a timely manner."
Will Weidman
Will Weidman
Ultrarunning
Read More
“UESCA and Jason Koop have put together the definitive source of knowledge for ultra marathons. As a coach and veteran of 70+ ultras, I learned a tremendous amount and can’t wait to put it into action personally and for my athletes!”
Deborah Livingston
Deborah Livingston
Ultrarunning
Read More
The UESCA Ultra-running Certification is packed with extremely informative and useful information to enhance an endurance running coach's knowledge base. I found the modules engaging with the newest information and thoughts in the ultra-running world. I really enjoyed the studies, charts and videos that solidified and clarified the information given.
Julian Fernandez
Julian Fernandez
Ultrarunning
Read More
If I was able to shave close to one hour from my 50K PR after I applied UESCA’s General Running Coach certification to my training, I can only imagine what I will be able to help my athletes achieve when applying the more specific Ultra Running certification principles to their training.
Previous
Next

Become a Certified Triathlon Coach

Triathlon Coaching Certification
Please enter your email below to receive our newsletter and Triathlon Certification course overview/syllabus… oh, and a link to get $50 off the certification price!

Follow Us